STORIA E ORIGINE DELLA CASATA MUCCIOLO
(o MUCCIOLI)


Francesco Mucciolo fought as an officer under Garibaldi during the Unification of Italy.
Antonio Mucciolo was Francesco's son. Antonio has several offspring, Francesco, Micheli, John, Giuseppe, Pasquale, Carmino, Angelina and Rosina.
Micheli, who was born in 1881, emmigrated to America in 1900. He married Angelina Nappa in 1911 in New York. They had eleven children, of which seven survived. They were (Marc) Antonio (Anthony), Maria, Francesco, Giovanni, Rosa, Elena and Stella.
Carlo Mucciolo, born in 1858, was Ambassador to Venice, and Director of the Mosaic Studio of the Vatican. He is the author of the great portrait (grandioso quadro) of the Apparition of Jesus at Saint Mary Alacocque. In later years it was reproduced in mosaic in the Vatican Basilica across from the tomb of Pope Alessandro VII.

 The Origins of the House of Mucciolo/Muccioli 


Studio Araldico Genealogico
by Michele Del Verme
Prignano Cilanto (Salerno) Italia

Translated by
Josephine, Anthony and Gene Mucciolo
August 1994 and May 1997, Town of Buffalo, Wisconsin.


From the encyclopedia Vittorio Spreti:

The family Mucciolo originated in the city of Toledo de Spania in the year 711 with the names of Mulcios Y Orosos Albos. According to Spreti (Encylopedia of Italian Nobility), there are indications that around the year 1000 A.D. the Mucciolo family went to Marchigiana where the first generation (in Italy) was born.

During the period of the Moors invasion of Spain, the Mucciolo family left Spain and found refuge in Italy. During this tumultuous period, all of Spain suffered during this invasion. Many people lost their liberty and the upper class had to leave the country or be put to death. The enclyopedia states that the Mucciolos who left Marchigiana and settled in other parts of Italy "produced persons of first class and nobility."

One branch of the Mucciolo family went to Bologna where Giovanni Marino Mulcios was elevated to the Order Gerosolimitano. In the year 1116 he married Carlotta Luchin of the Order Cavallerasca de Calatrava, whose family also orginated in Spain.

Another branch went to the city of Urbine, San Marino, where the name Mucci or Muccioli was first used. In the year 1300, Cielo Mucci was called Mucci di Ciole; all of his heirs were called Mucci di Ciole, which later became Muccioli and Mucciolo.

The first person in San Marino who took the name Mucciolo was Simone, in the year 1350. Simone had two sons, Luigi and Matteo. Matteo became Councilman of San Marino. In 1450 he became Captain of the Republic of San Marino and served in that capacity until 1452.

Some of the Mucciolos of San Marino were called Mucciolino. Gregorio Mucciolino was elected Captain Regent (Capitano Reggente) of the Republic of San Marino in 1402. The Mucciolo family in San Marino not only had the title of Captain Regent, but also enjoyed the "prestige of nobility and wealth." Such "spiritual and grand heritage" continued to his descendants. A son of Simone Mucciolo also served as Captain Regent from 1481 to 1490.

Not all of the Mucciolos remained in San Marino and Bologna. Luigi Matteo Mucciolo went to Urbine in 1494 and was a "Professor of Tradition and Culture." Luigi had a daughter named Angela who married Carlo Vertichi.

In the city of Ferrara the Mucciolos were noted as "illustrious gentleman of nobility." Luigi was sent as Ambassador to Julio the Second to ask for the hand of Signorina de Pesaro. He accomplished his objective and was compensated with many priviledges. He became a nobleman and was Mayor of the city of Pesaro from 1511 to 1513.

During his reign he built the chapel of San Bastiano and Catarina. Benedetto Muccioli, the son of Bartolomeo Muccioli from Ferrara, painted the chapel. In the city of Ferrara, Bartolomeo and Benedetto were artists. Another son of Bartolomeo, Almerico, was known as a great artist. Antonio was a Canon in the Cathedral of Bologna and was also Secreatry to Cardinal Madrucci. Simone and Paolo were Captains in 1570. Camillo was "Commandant of the Royal Guard" and "Advisor of War" to Enrico the Fourth, King of France, from 1589 to 1610. Luigi de Simone had another son named Giovanni Marino who was the "head of all the branches of the Muccioli family".

The King of Spain confirmed that all the "family Mucciolo" was nobility and had the title of Duke. This honor was bestowed not only on those in Spain but those in San Marino and Bologna. The King of Spain confirms also that the title was already given to all the branches of the family. All the branches, as declared by the King of Spain on April 12, 1920 were re-recognized as old Spanish nobility. Today, all of the branches of the Mucciolo family are still considered nobility.

Carlo Mucciolo, born in 1858, was Ambassador to Venice, and Director of the Mosaic Studio of the Vatican. He is the author of the great portrait (grandioso quadro) of the Apparition of Jesus at Saint Mary Alacocque. In later years it was reproduced in mosaic in the Vatican Basilica across from the tomb of Pope Alessandro VII.

The Neopolitan branch comes from Julio Muccioli. From this branch came the descendants of the Mucciolos of Naples.

Micheli, who was born in 1881, emmigrated to America in 1900. He married Angelina Nappa in 1911 in New York. They had eleven children, of which seven survived. One of them was MarcAntonio, who was born in 1913 in Flushing, New York. He married Giuseppina (Josephine) Faso in 1941 in Flushing. Anthony entered the US Army in 1943, and served during World War 2 in the 63rd Infantry Division, Signal Company. Anthony was wounded in action April 16, 1944 in Kunzelsau, Germany, for which he was awarded the Purple Heart, among many other citations.

 

GUISEPPINA (JOSEPHINE) FASO MUCCIOLO


Giovanna & Rosario (Sam) Giglio, circa 1950, California
Josephine & grandmother Giovanna, circa 1929. Josephine had just cut her hair for her passport photo.
Fasos, circa 1950

Giuseppina Cosma-Damiana Faso was born in Caccamo, Province of Palermo, Sicily on September 27, 1917. Her grandfather, Giovanni Faso was an orphan who became a blacksmith (ferraio) and owned the only blacksmith shop in the town. He married Giuseppina Cecala, sister of Bishop Cecala of Palermo. They had eight children, Rosario, Giuseppe, Salvatore, Giuseppina, Serafina, Concetta, Giovannina, and Angelina.

Giuseppe married Angelina Arena and had one child. Salvatore (1892 - 1963) was a Jesuit priest. Concetta married Mariano Prinzi and had four children, Maria, Jo, Biagio and Pina. Giovannina married a Faso and had one son. The other three sisters never married. Roasario, Giuseppina’s father, was a barber and had the only barber shop in town. He married Giovanna Indorante in June 1916. Rosario died on October 7, 1919.

In 1924, Giovanna married Rosario (Sam) Giglio. They lived in Sam’s home town of Ciminna.

Giuseppina was left to live with her maternal grandmother, Georgia Passantino Indorante in Caccamo. Sam and Giovanna had one daughter, Rosina born May 10, 1925. In 1926, Sam, Giovanna and Rose left Italy for America. Giuseppina was left in Italy with her grandmother. Giovanna was eight months pregnant at the time, and had to hide her pregnancy from Italian authorities in order to travel. In 1926 Gina was born in New York city, but died at the age of two from diphtheria.

On December 13, 1929 Georgia passed away. On April 30, 1930 Josephine left Caccamo for Palermo where she met her paternal grandfather, Nicasio Indorante for the first time. On May 1, 1930 she left Palermo for Naples, and on May 4 left Naples for America. She spent 7 unhappy days on the ship, crying and begging the captain to return to Italy. On May 11, she arrived I New York city. She was met by her mother, Sam, sister Rose and baby Salvatore. They were all as strangers to her. The next 5 years were very hard for her, because she wanted to return to Italy. She went to school and was placed in the third grade. In two years she graduated from the eighth grade with honors. She was not allowed to go to high school, but had to work on the sewing machine for her mother.

She became friends with one of the girls that worked in her mother’s shop. Through her, she met her friend's brother Johnny Danielo and fell in love. They became engaged in 1939, much to the objection of her mother. Johnny wanted to elope, but she did not want to hurt his family because they had been so good to her. She had an argument with him and ran away from home. One of her mother’s friends found her and told ner mother who came after her. She returned to work in the factory working both days and nights.

A worker in the factory, Florence Mucciolo, had an ear operation. Josephine went to visit her and met Anthony. He asked her to go out with him, but she refused because she was engaged. When Florence came back to work she asked Josephine to spend the memorial day weekend at her summer home. When Florence came to pick up Josephine, Anthony was also in the car. They enjoyed a very nice and entertaining weekend at the beach, barbecuing and walking through the woods. They made arrangements for a date, and much to her mother’s delight she broke off the engagement with Johnny. Anthony and Josephine married on February 9, 1941.